From ‘Nishitani Keiji’s “The Standpoint of Zen: Directly Pointing to the Mind”, by Bret W. Davis, in “Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings’, (W. Edelglass and J. Garfield)

“To cut through the mind of self-attachment that arises in the form of the ego-self is at the same time to go beyond the world (or the so-called “three worlds” of desire, form, and formlessness). This is the “great death” of Zen, which cuts through the roots of life and death for the first time. In consciousness-only theory, it is said that in extinguishing vijñana or consciousness, the visaya or world of objects over against it is finally extinguished. What comes to be manifest here is the non-discriminating or fundamental knowledge which in usual Buddhist parlance is called prajña. Its standpoint is that which has transcended the world to the “other shore,” which has gone beyond all possible beings in their very beingness, i.e., insofar as they are thought to be, and in this sense is called absolute emptiness (sunyata). This of course does not mean void or empty in a privative sense, emptiness as opposed to fullness. Rather it is the standpoint of the oneness of mind and things. Here all things cease to be the world of objects over against the discriminative mind, and manifest their true form in the field of absolute emptiness. All things manifesting their true form is nothing other than nondiscriminating knowledge. This then is the standpoint of the great wisdom of the oneness of things and mind, the wisdom that is prajña. It is here that the realization of self as no-self, the awareness of one’s own true self, occurs. All things are brought to light as being originally without self-nature, “self”-less, as being no-self-nature. All things are “no-self-nature as emptiness.” And this at the same time means that each and every thing becomes manifest in its true reality.

[…]

“I” directly see “myself” in the appearance of every single thing just as it is, as though two mirrors were mutually reflecting one another.” [emphasis added]

From ‘Nishitani Keiji’s “The Standpoint of Zen: Directly Pointing to the Mind”, by Bret W. Davis, in “Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings’, (W. Edelglass and J. Garfield)

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