From ‘Refrain from All Evil Whatsoever’, in the “Shōbōgenzō”, by Eihei Dogen

Carved lid of the tomb of K'inich Janaab Pakal I, the Great
Carved lid of the tomb of K’inich Janaab Pakal I, the Great

original vector graphics by Madman2001 (CC BY-SA 2.0 )

 

“Rouse your heart and mind fully and do your training and practice, for when you rouse your heart and mind to do the training and practice, you will have already realized eight- or nine-tenths of the Way.

[…]

Moreover, when we train and practice upon the great earth with its mountains and rivers, and beneath the sun, moon, and stars, then the great earth with its mountains and rivers, as well as the sun, moon, and stars, will help us to train ourselves and to do the practice.

[…]

The karmic consequences of our good and bad actions are what we are training with. That is, we try not to set karmic consequences into motion or not to stir things up. There is a time when karmic consequences are what cause us to do the training and practice. Once the true face of our karma has been made clear to us, then we understand what ‘refraining’ really means, for this refraining is what Buddha Nature is: it is being impermanent, it is being subject to causality, and it is being free, because it is letting go.

[…]

The true Dharma Body of the Buddha Is unbounded, like empty space. It reveals Its form in accordance with an object, Like the moon reflected in water.

[…]

A virtuous elder once said, “When you were born, you were provided with the lion’s roar.” Being provided with the lion’s roar is the meritorious fruit of a Tathagata’s turning of the Wheel of the Dharma: it is the turning of the Wheel of the Dharma. And another virtuous elder said, “The coming and going of birth and death is the Real Body of man.” Thus it is that clarifying what one’s True Body is and possessing the merit from the lion’s roar will indeed be the One Great Matter, and I do not mean that the task is easy or simple. Hence, attempting to clarify what prompts the words and actions of a three-year-old is also the Great Cause for which we train, since it is the same—and yet not the same—as what prompts the words and actions of all the Buddhas […]”

(full text – page 78)

From ‘Refrain from All Evil Whatsoever’, in the “Shōbōgenzō”, by Eihei Dogen

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